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Cross-border movement (CBM) reports

Cross-border movements occur when physical currency or bearer negotiable instruments (BNIs) are brought into or out of Australia. All individuals and reporting entities must report cross-border movements of cash in Australian or foreign currency if the combined value is A$10,000 or more.

Cross-border movements can happen when someone carries money with them across a border (such as on a plane) or when someone sends or receives money to or from overseas via mail or shipping (including by courier).

Types of cross-border movement (CBM) reports

There are three types of cross-border movement reports.

  • Cross-border Movement – Physical Currency (Carrying) report. This report must be made if you carry cash in Australian and foreign currency with a combined value of A$10,000 or more when departing or entering Australia via an international airport or seaport.
  • Cross-border Movement – BNI report. This must be made if you carry bearer negotiable instruments of any amount (or no face value) and are asked to make a report by an Australian Border Force officer or police officer
  • Cross-border Movement – Physical Currency (Mailing) report. You must make this report if you send or receive cash by ship or courier, or mail it into or out of Australia.

Reporting cash when travelling overseas

You usually declare physical currency at the Customs examination area when entering or leaving Australia. You can fill in the form at the international airport or seaport, or you can download and complete the form before you leave.

If you want to complete the form before arriving at your departure point:

  1. Download the Cross-Border Movement – Physical Currency (Carrying) form (PDF, 1.2MB). Print it out, then complete and sign the form.
  2. Bring the completed form with you to the airport or seaport.
  3. Give the form to an Australian Border Force or police officer.

Rules about carrying and declaring money

Reporting cash sent or received by shipping or mail

If you mail or ship Australian or foreign physical currency with a combined value of A$10,000 or more out of Australia, you must declare it to an Australian Border Force officer, police officer or directly to AUSTRAC. You must do this before sending the currency out of Australia.

If you receive Australian or foreign physical currency with a combined value of A$10,000 or more from outside Australia, you must submit a report to an Australian Border Force officer, police officer or directly to AUSTRAC. You must do this within five business days of receiving the currency.

Contact us to get the Cross Border Movement – Physical Currency (Mailing) form for declaring mailed or shipped physical currency.

What happens to CBM reports

CBM–PC and CBM–BNI reports made at an airport or seaport are usually handed to an Australian Border Force officer or police officer, who checks the form is filled in correctly before sending it to AUSTRAC.

If the CBM–PC report relates to cash being mailed or shipped, then you must send the form directly to an Australian Border Force officer, police officer or AUSTRAC yourself.

Penalties for not reporting cross-border movements

You will face penalties, including prison and/or a fine, for:

  • not declaring cash in Australian and foreign currency if the combined value is A$10,000 or more when you enter or leave Australia
  • not declaring a BNI when asked by Border Force or police officers.

The penalties for failing to declare either type of CBM can include up to two years’ jail or a fine of up to 500 penalty units.

Find out more about penalties and enforcement.

Exemptions from CBM reporting

A CBM–PC report does not have to be made by:

  • commercial airlines where the physical currency is in the possession of passengers
  • commercial goods carriers when carrying currency for a person without being informed about the presence of the cash.

There are no exemptions from CBM–BNI reporting obligations.

The content on this website is general and is not legal advice. Before you make a decision or take a particular action based on the content on this website, you should check its accuracy, completeness, currency and relevance for your purposes. You may wish to seek independent professional advice.

Last updated: 19 Jul 2019
Page ID: 30

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